UN Reports – All

Angola – Promotion and protection of all human rights, civil, political, economics, social and cultural rights – Human Rights Council 7th session, 6 March 2008

The historical and political context of the current assessment is the 27-year civil war in Angola following independence in 1975 and an earlier lengthy struggle against colonialism. A peace agreement signed in 2002 between the Government of the People’s Armed Forces for the Liberation of Angola (MPLA) and the National Union for the Total Independence of Angola (UNITA) put an end to the conflict but could not reverse the devastating effect it had had on the country and its infrastructure, which reportedly left at least 500,000 people dead and, at the time, millions of internally displaced persons. An armed struggle has persisted in the enclave of Cabinda led by the Front for the Liberation of the Enclave of Cabinda, albeit at a much lower level, despite the signing of a memorandum of understanding for peace and reconciliation on 1 August 2006.
In Angola today, many are able to practice their religion or belief freely; there is, in this regard, a measure of tolerance within Angolan society. The Special Rapporteur, however, notes a number of concerns.

See full report here

Seeking meaning: an anthropological and community-based approach to witchcraft accusations and their prevention in refugee situations

An excellent overview by Schnoebelen has shown that accusations of witchcraft have occurred in many situations of concern to UNHCR, for example amongst internally displaced in Northern Uganda and in refugee camps and settlements from South Africa through to Chad (2009). Accusations against children in refugee and IDP communities have also been a focus of particular attention in a recent report (Bussein et.al 2011). However detailed anthropological accounts of such accusations are still rare in the refugee studies literature, exceptions being the discussion by Harrell-Bond of ‘poisoning’ amongst Ugandan refugees in Sudan (1986) and a paper by Golooba-Mutebi (2004) on accusations amongst Mozambican refugees and their South African hosts.
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Report of the Special Rapporteur on violence against women, its causes and consequences, on her mission to Papua New Guinea (18–26 March 2012)

The present report contains the findings of the Special Rapporteur on violence against women, its causes and consequences, following her visit to Papua New Guinea. The
Special Rapporteur examines the situation of violence against women in the country, including violence that is perpetrated within the family and the community; violence
occurring in institutional settings; and violence related to the development of the country‟s extractive industries. She discusses the State‟s legislative and institutional responses to such violence, and provides recommendations. Read the full report  here

Violence Against Children Accused of Witchcraft – Statement by the Special Representative of the Secretary General on Violence Against Children

Violence Against Children Accused of Witchcraft, Statement by the Special Representative of the Secretary General on Violence Against Children – Marta Santos Pais –   Geneva, 10 March 2014. See full statement here

WHRIN Launches Report to UN – 21st Century Witchcraft Accusations and Persecution

Geneva, March 10th  2014 – WHRIN launches what may be the first ever report into the global scale of witchcraft accusations and persecution, muti killings and human sacrifice at the 25th session of the UN Human Rights Council. See full report here
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Briefing Paper European Parliament: Directorate-General For External Policies of the Union Directorate – Child Witchcraft Allegations and Human Rights

Despite the recording of child witchcraft allegations all over the world as human rights violations, the issue has received relatively little attention within human rights discourse from international organizations, academia or civil society. Child witchcraft accusations are a relatively recent phenomenon that is not among the traditional practices of the countries affected. The reasons why children have become the specific focus of child witchcraft accusations remain partially unclear. A number of general common features can help explain its emergence, including profound societal transformations, religious changes, the collapse of traditional institutions and social problems suffered by both children and adults. To address the phenomenon’s complexity, it is necessary to carefully investigate each specific local context in which the allegations occur and to consider the consequences of the practice by the affected children. To read full report here

Persons with albinism: Report of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights

This preliminary report of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights on the attacks and discrimination against persons with albinism is submitted pursuant to Human Rights Council resolution 23/13 of 13 June 2013.In some communities, erroneous beliefs and myths influenced by superstition put the security and life of persons with albinism at risk. OHCHR has received information from various countries on cases of killings and dismembering of persons with albinism for ritual purposes. It has also collected information on the multiple and intersecting forms of discrimination persons with albinism face worldwide.To read full report click here

WHRIN Report to UN: Exploring the Role of Nollywood in the Muti Murders of Persons with Albinism

 

A Report to the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Right for the 24th Session of the Human Rights Council on the Attacks and Discrimination Against People With Albinism (PWA). See full report  here

Children with Albinism in Africa: Murder Mutilation and violence

This report was written for the UN Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Violence against children, Mme. Marta Santos Pais. The report presents a detailed and comprehensive overview of the situation in Tanzania concerning persons living with albinism (PWA), particularly children. See full report here: Comprehensive Report to Marta Santos – UN-SRSG and APPENDICES To Report to Marta Santos

Witchcraft accusations: A protection concern for UNHCR and the Wider Humanitarian Community?

The following paper takes a broad look at the belief in witchcraft around the world, identifies key groups that are at risk of witchcraft accusations, outlines where witchcraft accusations may be most likely to occur, analyses the factors that lead to these becoming a protection concern and finally makes a number of recommendations for policy makers and practitioners working on this issue. See here